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GOES High Density Winds

Other contributors: Chris Velden, Dave Stettner, Jeff Key, Kris Bedka, Jaime Daniels, Kevin Schrab, Brian Gockel, David Miller

Introduction


The objectives of this session are:

  1. Review techniques for deriving satellite winds (Atmospheric Motion Vectors)
  2. Provide details on AWIPS display of GOES High Density Winds
  3. Highlight latest winds research activities

Training Session Options


  1. Audio playback – This VISITview file contains recorded audio and annotations and can be taken at anytime. Certificates of completion for NOAA employees can be obtained through your Science Operation Officer or training point of contact.
    Create a directory, then download the audio playback file (it is about 274 MB in size) from the following site into that directory:
    ftp://rammftp.cira.colostate.edu/SHyMet/course_materials/winds_2006jan17_audio.exe
    OR
    ftp://ftp.ssec.wisc.edu/visit/winds_2006jan17_audio.exe
    After extracting the files into that directory click on the visitplay.bat file to start the lesson.
  •  

References/Additional Links


  • Velden, et al., 2005: Recent Innovations in Deriving Tropospheric Winds from Meteorological SatellitesBulletin of the American Meteorological Society: Vol. 86, No. 2, pp. 205-223.
  • Bedka and Mecikalski, 2005: Application of Satellite-Derived Atmospheric Motion Vectors for Estimating Mesoscale FlowJournal of Applied Meteorology: Vol. 44, No. 11, pp. 1761-1772.
  • GOES High Density Winds and Derived Products: Atlantic | Pacific (CIMSS Tropical Cyclones)
  • GOES High Density Winds: NESDIS FPDT | NOAA Geostationary Satellite Server
  • Upper Level Wind Analysis from GOES Water Vapor Winds (Experimental – CIMSS/NSSL)

Polar Satellite Products for the Operational Forecaster: Introduction

Produced by COMET

Introduction

This module will provide an overview of the current operational POES satellites and a small sample of the many meteorological products and their uses in operational weather forecasting.

Objectives:

  1. Comparison of POES and GOES satellite characteristics and capabilities.
  2. Overview of instrument configurations and observing capabilities on NOAA and DMSP satellites.
  3. List of products that highlights POES data usage important to operational forecasting such as:
    1. Visible and infrared imagery.
    2. Fog / stratus product.
    3. Fire detection.
    4. Volcanic ash detection.
    5. Microwave applications.
    6. Forecast applications.

Training Session Options:

You may take the session by clicking here

References/Additional Links

An Introduction to POES Data and Products

Satellite Applications to Tropical Cyclones

Other Contributors: John Knaff, Eileen Maturi

Introduction

The goal of this course is to provide an overview of satellite methods for analysis of tropical cyclones (TCs) and their environment.

Objectives:

  1. Review of sensors for TC analysis
    1. Geostationary
    2. Polar orbiting
      1. Passive
      2. Active
  2. Center fixing and intensity estimation
    1. The traditional Dvorak method
    2. Microwave methods
  3. Short term forecasting methods
    1. TC motion
    2. Vertical shear
    3. Upper ocean structure estimation D. Storm structure analysis

Training Session Options:

Audio playback – This VISITview file contains recorded audio and annotations and can be taken at anytime. Certificates of completion for NOAA employees can be obtained through your Science Operation Officer or training point of contact.

Create a directory to download the audio playback file (it is about 57 MB in size) from one of the following sites:

ftp://rammftp.cira.colostate.edu/SHyMet/course_materials/shymet_tropical_audio_7april06.exe

OR

ftp://ftp.ssec.wisc.edu/visit/shymet_tropical_audio_7april06.exe

After extracting the files into that directory click on the visitplay.bat file to start the lesson.

 

Introduction to satellite interpretation for severe weather

Other Contributors:
John Weaver, Dan Lindsey, Jim Purdom, Dolores Kiessling (COMET)

Introduction


Objectives: Identify the main uses of satellite imagery for severe weather events 1. Pre-storm environment Identify different air masses / boundaries Fine tune potential regions for convective initiation 2. Nowcast / WDM process (use effectively with other sensors, i.e. radar, METARs, lightning etc.) Analyze storm scale features Monitor potential storm / boundary interactions

Training Session Options:


Audio playback – This VISITview file contains recorded audio and annotations and can be taken at anytime. Certificates of completion for NOAA employees can be obtained through your Science Operation Officer or training point of contact. For detailed information on how to view the recorded session Create a directory to download the audio playback file (it is about 146 MB in size) from one of the following sites:

After extracting the files into that directory click on the visitplay.bat file to start the lesson.

References/Additional Links


NESDIS GOES sounder single field of view (SFOV) soundings
Real-time GOES RSO data (RSO RAMSDIS online)

Purdom, J.F.W., 1976: Some uses of high-resolution GOES imagery in the mesoscale forecasting of convection and its behavior. Mon. Wea. Rev., 104, 1474-1483. Scofield, R.A. and J.F.W. Purdom, 1986: The Use of Satellite data for Mesoscale Analyses and Forecasting Application. Chapter 7 in the book Mesoscale Meteorology and Forecasting, P.S. Ray, editor, Amer. Meteor. Soc., Boston, MA, 118-150. Davies, J.M., C.A. Doswell III, D.W. Burgess, and J.W. Weaver, 1994: Some noteworthy aspects of the Hesston, Kansas tornado family of 13 March 1990. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 75, 1007-1017. Markowski. P.M., E.N. Rasmussen, and J.M. Straka, 1998: The occurrence of tornadoes in supercells interacting with boundaries during VORTEX-95. Wea. Forecasting, 11, 852-859. Weaver, J.F., 1979: Storm motion as related to boundary-layer convergence. Mon. Wea. Rev., 107, 612-619. Weaver, J.F., and S.P. Nelson, 1982: Multiscale aspects of thunderstorm gust fronts and their effects on subsequent storm development. Mon. Wea. Rev., 110, 707-718. Weaver, J.F., and J.F.W. Purdom, 1995: An interesting mesoscale storm-environment interaction observed just prior to changes in severe storm behavior. Wea. Forecasting, 10, 449-453. Bikos, D., Weaver, J., and B. Motta, 2002: A Satellite Perspective of the 3 May 1999 Great Plains Tornado Outbreak within Oklahoma. Wea. Forecasting, 17, 635-646. Browning, P., Weaver, J.F., and Connell, B., 1997: The Moberly, Missouri, Tornado of 4 July 1995. Wea. Forecasting, 12, 915-927. Purdom, J.F.W. 1990: Convective Scale Weather Analysis and Forecasting. Chapter VII-8 in Weather Satellites: Systems, Data, and Environmental Applications, Rao, P.K., Holmes, S.J., Anderson, R.K., Winston, J.S., Lehr, P.E, editors, Amer. Meteor. Soc., Boston, MA, 285-304. Krauss, T.W. and J.D. Marwitz, 1984: Precipiation Processes within an Alberta Supercell Hailstorm. J. Atmos. Sci., 46, 1025-1034. Lemon, L.R., 1976: The Flanking Line, a Severe Thunderstorm Intensification Source. J. Atmos. Sci., 33, 686-694. Rasmussen, E.N., S. Richardson, J.M. Straka, P.M. Markowski, and D.O. Blanchard, 2000: The Association of Significant Tornadoes with a Baroclinic Boundary on 2 June 1995. Mon. Wea. Rev., 128, 174-191. Weaver, J.F, J.A. Knaff, D. Bikos, G.S. Wade, J.M. Daniels, 2002: Satellite Observations of a Severe Supercell Thunderstorm 24 July 2000 made during the GOES-11 Science Test. Wea. Forecasting, 17 (1), 124-138.

Talking Points


Talking points – these may be used by local offices in tandem with the audio playback version of the training session. The talking points may be printed out to easily review the session in detail at any time. The talking points may be

downloaded as a Word document

Cyclogenesis: Analysis utilizing Geostationary Satellite Imagery

Other contributors: Brian Motta, Donald Moore, Stephen Jascourt, NWSFO BOX, SEW and MHX

Introduction


The objectives of this session are:

  • Examine various conceptual models of cyclogenesis (basic, split flow, cold air, instant occlusion and in-stream).
  • Learn to utilize a blend of conceptual models, satellite imagery, and NWP output in diagnosing cyclogenesis

Training Session Options:


    • A.) Audio playback – This VISITview file contains recorded audio and annotations and can be taken at anytime. Certificates of completion for NOAA employees can be obtained through your Science Operation Officer or training point of contact.
      Create a directory, then download the audio playback file (it is about 87 MB in size) from the following site into that directory:

ftp://rammftp.cira.colostate.edu/SHyMet/course_materials/SMcyclo_29jun05.exe

    • OR

ftp://ftp.ssec.wisc.edu/visit/SMcyclo_29jun05.exe

    • After extracting the files into that directory click on the visitplay.bat file to start the lesson.

References/Additional Links


Bader, M.J., G.S. Forbes, J.R. Grant, R.B.E. Lilley, and A.J. Waters, 1995: Images in Weather Forecasting. University Press, Cambridge, Great Britain, 499 pp.

Harrold, T.W. 1973: Mechanisms influencing the distribution of precipitation within baoclinic disturbances. Q.J.R. Meteorol. Soc. , 99 , 232-251.

Carlson, T.N., 1980: Airflow Through Midlatitude Cyclones and the Comma Cloud Pattern. Mon. Wea. Rev. , 108 , 1498-1509.

Young, M.V., G.A. Monk and K.A. Browning, 1987: Interpretation of satellite imagery of a rapidly developing cyclone. Q.J.R. Meteorol. Soc. , 113 , 1089-1115.

Browning, K.A., and N.M. Roberts, 1994: Structure of a frontal cyclone. Q.J.R. Meteorol. Soc. , 120 , 1535-1557.

Talking Points

Talking points – these may be used by local offices in tandem with the audio playback version of the training session. The talking points may be printed out to easily review the session in detail at any time. The talking points may be

downloaded as a Word document

GOES Sounder Data and Products

Other contributors: Tim Schmit, Gary Wade, Jim Nelson, Jaime Daniels

Introduction


The objectives of this session are:

A.) Overview of the GOES Sounder instrument

B.) Sounder temperature and moisture retrievals

C.) Derived Product Imagery (DPI) opperational applications. image enhancements.

D.) Future sounder improvements

Training Session Options:


    • A.) Audio playback – This VISITview file contains recorded audio and annotations and can be taken at anytime. Certificates of completion for NOAA employees can be obtained through your Science Operation Officer or training point of contact.
      Create a directory, then download the audio playback file (it is about 87 MB in size) from the following site into that directory:

ftp://rammftp.cira.colostate.edu/SHyMet/course_materials/sounder_7apr10_audio.exe

    After extracting the files into that directory click on the visitplay.bat file to start the lesson.

References/Additional Links


Suggested Enhancements for AWIPS GOES Sounder Derived Products

Realtime GOES sounder data and products on the Web:

  • NOAA/NESDIS Operational Products Development Branch
  • CIMSS Realtime GOES Products
  • CIMSS GOES Sounder Derived Products Collaboration siteReferences:
  • Bayler, G. M., R. M. Aune, and W. H. Raymond, 2001: NWP cloud initialization using GOES sounder data and improved modeling of non-precipitating clouds. /Mon. Wea. Rev/., 128, 3911-3920.
  • Daniels, J. M., T. J. Schmit, and D.W. Hillger, 2001: GOES-11 Science Test: GOES-11 Imager and Sounder Radiance and Product Validations. NOAA Technical Report NESDIS 103, U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington, DC.
  • Dostalek, John F. and Timothy J. Schmit, 2001: Total precipitable water measurements from GOES sounder derived product imagery. /Wea. Forecasting/, *16*, 573-587.
  • Ellrod, Gary P., Nelson, James P., Witiw, Michael R., Bottos, Lynda, Roeder, William P. 2000: *Experimental GOES Sounder Products for the Assessment of Downburst Potential.* /Weather and Forecasting/: Vol. 15, No. 5, pp. 527–542.
  • Hillger, D. W., T. J. Schmit, and J. M. Daniels, 2003: Imager and Sounder Radiance and Product Validations for the GOES-12 Science Test, NOAA Technical Report 115, U.S. Department of Commerce, Washington, DC.
  • Li, J., C. C. Schmidt, J. P. Nelson III, T. J. Schmit, and W. P. Menzel, 2001: Estimation of total atmospheric ozone from GOES sounder radiances with high temporal resolution. /J. Atmos. Oceanic Technol., /18, 157-168.Ma, X. L., T. Schmit, and W. L. Smith, 1999: A non-linear physical retrieval algorithm – its application to the GOES-8/9 sounder. /J. Appl. Meteor./, *38*, 501-513.
  • Schmit T. J., W. F. Feltz, W. P. Menzel, J. Jung, A. P. Noel, J. N. Heil, J. P. Nelson III, G. S. Wade, 2002: Validation and use of GOES sounder moisture information, /Wea. Forecasting/, *17*, 139-154.
  • Schreiner, A. J., T. J. Schmit, and R. M. Aune, 2002: Maritime inversions and the GOES sounder cloud product. /Nat. Wea. Assoc. Digest/, *26*, 1,2 27-38.
  • Schreiner, Anthony J., Timothy J. Schmit, and W. Paul Menzel, 2001: Observations and trends of clouds based on GOES sounder data. /J. Geophys. Res./, *106*, 20,349-20,363.
  • Images of satellite-derived cloud top pressure for the contiguous United States, Schreiner et al., Proceedings of the National Weather Association Conference, pp 35, December 3-8 1995.
  • Derived Product Imagery from GOES-8, Hayden, C.M., G.S. Wade, and T.J. Schmit, Journal of Appiled Meteorology, 35, pp 153-162, 1996.
  • Application of GOES-8/9 Soundings to Weather Forecasting and Nowcasting, Menzel et al., Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 79, 1998.
  • Satellite Meteorology: Using the GOES Sounder (COMET CD-ROM, September 1998)

Satellite Meteorology: GOES Channel Selection

Produced by COMET

Introduction


This module will introduce you to the visible and infrared channels on GOES and detail new applications available with this generation of GOES satellites. Also included are future changes to the water vapor channel and the replacement of the 12 micron “dirty window” channel with the new 13.3 micron carbon dioxide channel available on the GOES 12-P satellites. Each channel has its own section with information on both specifications and guidance for operational forecasters.

Training Session Options:


You may take the session by clicking here

References/Additional Links


CIRA / RAMM team GOES 3.9 um channel tutorial

GOES Imaging and Sounding area coverage, resolution, and image frequency

Introduction


The objective of this session is: To learn about basic characteristics and functions of the GOES satellite: environmental sensing and other tasks, channels, image resolution, location, coverage, and schedules.

Training Session Options:


  1. Web-based training session
    – a “stand alone” version viewed via a Web browser, with embedded talking points included. This lesson version may be viewed at any time and takes 30 minutes These slides are ideal for printing from the web-browser, just print preview first to choose portrait or landscape mode.
  2. Audio playback – This VISITview file contains recorded audio and annotations and can be taken at anytime. Create a directory to download the audio playback file (it is about 13 MB in size) from the following site: audio download version After extracting the files into that directory click on the visitplay.bat file to start the lesson.

Note: Be sure to have your speakers on and the volume loud enough to hear the presentation. Two separate windows will appear after starting the module. One of them is a playback control window, allowing you to change slides (they are changed automatically by default), click on slide 1 at the top to begin the presentation. (Sometime the playback control window is hidden under the next window – the controls frame.) The other window is the controls frame, this is where you can click the See URL button whenever it is highlighted to bring up a separate browser that goes to the URL listed on the page.

References/Additional Links


  • Space Systems Loral, 1996 : GOES I-M DataBook Can be found online
  • NOAA/NESDIS Satellite and Information Service, Satellite Services Division: look for GOES Satellite Operations
  • GOES Frequently Asked Questions for Forecasters (On the VISIT homepage)
  • NOAAPORT User’s page: Latitude/Longitude Dimensions of Remapped GOES/Composite Imager Products

SHyMet Intern Orientation

Introduction


The content of this session focuses on: Welcome to the Satellite Hydrology and Meteorology (SHyMet) Intern Course Meet the instructors/contributors Course logistics Course topics and student guides Sources of information

Training Session Options


  1. Web-based training session – a “stand alone” version viewed via a Web browser, with embedded talking points included. These slides are ideal for printing from the web-browser, just print preview first to choose portrait or landscape mode.
  2. Audio playback – This VISITview file contains recorded audio and annotations and can be taken at anytime. Certificates of completion for NOAA employees can be obtained through your Science Operation Officer or training point of contact.

    Create a directory to download the audio playback file (it is about 10 MB in size): Audio download version
    After extracting the files into that directory click on the visitplay.bat file to start the lesson.
    Note: Be sure to have your speakers on and the volume loud enough to hear the presentation.